JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting

Improving pediatric and adolescent health outcomes and empowering and educating parents

Editor-in-Chief:

Sherif Badawy, MD, MS, MBA, Associate Professor of Pediatrics; Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago; Illinois, United States (ORCID)


Impact Factor 3.7

JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting (JPP, ISSN: 2561-6722, Impact Factor 3.7)is an open access journal. JPP has a unique focus on technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, informatics applications for patient/parent education, training, counselling, behavioral interventions, preventative interventions and clinical care for pediatric and adolescent populations or child-parent dyads. JPP recognizes the role of patient- and parent-centered approaches in the 21st century using information and communication technologies to optimize pediatric and adolescent health outcomes.

As an open access journal, we are read by clinicians, patients, and parents/caregivers alike. We, as all journals published by JMIR Publications, have a focus on applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews).

In 2023, JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting received an inaugural Journal Impact Factor™ of 3.7 (Source: Journal Citation Reports™ from Clarivate, 2023)JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting is indexed in PubMedPubMed CentralDOAJScopus, EBSCO/EBSCO Essentials, and the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate).

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Recent Articles

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General Parenting Education and Training

Successful national safer sleep campaigns in the United Kingdom have lowered the death rates from sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) over the past 3 decades, but deaths persist in socioeconomically deprived families. The circumstances of current deaths suggest that improvements in support for some families to follow safer sleep advice more consistently could save lives.

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Kids' and Adolescents' Use of Technology

There is limited understanding of the concept of the digital identity of young children created through engagement on social networking sites.

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Pregnancy Information, Education and Lifestyle Interventions

In many areas of health care, learning health care systems (LHSs) are seen as promising ways to accelerate research and outcomes for patients by reusing health and research data. For example, considering pregnant and lactating people, for whom there is still a poor evidence base for medication safety and efficacy, an LHS presents an interesting way forward. Combining unique data sources across Europe in an LHS could help clarify how medications affect pregnancy outcomes and lactation exposures. In general, a remaining challenge of data-intensive health research, which is at the core of an LHS, has been obtaining meaningful access to data. These unique data sources, also called data access providers (DAPs), are both public and private organizations and are important stakeholders in the development of a sustainable and ethically responsible LHS. Sustainability is often discussed as a challenge in LHS development. Moreover, DAPs are increasingly expected to move beyond regulatory compliance and are seen as moral agents tasked with upholding ethical principles, such as transparency, trustworthiness, responsibility, and community engagement.

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Chronic Disease Self-Management in Childhood and Adolescence

Studies have highlighted significant challenges associated with the transition from pediatric to adult health and social care services for youth living with childhood-acquired disabilities and their caregivers. Patient navigation has been proposed as an effective transitional care intervention. Better understanding of how patient navigation may support youth and their families during pediatric to adult care transitions is warranted.

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Perinatal Education for Parents

Globally, high rates of maternal and infant mortality call for interventions during the perinatal period to engage pregnant people as well as their loved ones in care. Mobile health technologies have become ubiquitous in our lives and in health care settings. However, there is a need to further explore their safety and effectiveness to support and improve health outcomes locally and globally.

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Kids' and Adolescents' Use of Technology

Digital health interventions are increasingly used to deliver health-related interventions for children and young people to change health behaviors and improve health outcomes. Digital health interventions have the potential to enhance access to and engagement with children and young people; however, they may also increase the divide between those who can access technology and are supported to engage and those who are not. This review included studies that reported on the access to or engagement with digital health interventions among children and young people.

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Parenting

Since 2020, parents have had increasing opportunities to use telemedicine for their children, but how parents decide whether to use telemedicine for acute pediatric care relative to alternative sites of care is not clear. One of the most common reasons parents seek acute care for their children is for acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs).

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Screening and Early Diagnosis in Pediatrics

Screening for risk behaviors is a routine and essential component of adolescent preventive health visits. Early identification of risks can inform targeted counseling and care. If stored in discrete fields in the electronic health record (EHR), adolescent screening data can also be used to understand risk behaviors across a clinic or health system, or to support quality improvement projects.

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Parenting

Falls are the most common hospitalized injury mechanism in children aged ≤1 years, and currently, there are no targeted prevention interventions. The prevention of falls in children of this age requires changes in the behavior of their caregivers, and theoretically informed digital behavior change interventions (DBCIs) may provide a unique mechanism for achieving effective intervention. However, user acceptance and the ability of DBCIs to effect the required changes in behavior are critical to their likelihood of success.

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Social Media for Parenting

The use of social media by adolescents has increased considerably in the past decade. With this increase of social media use in our daily lives, there has been a rapidly expanding awareness of the potential unhealthy lifestyle-related health effects arising from excessive, mal-adaptive or addictive social media use.

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Pregnancy Information, Education and Lifestyle Interventions

Stress and anxiety during pregnancy are extremely prevalent and are associated with numerous poor outcomes, among the most serious of which are increased rates of preterm birth and low birth weight infants. Research supports that while in-person mindfulness training is effective in reducing pregnancy stress and anxiety, there are barriers limiting accessibility.

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