JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting

Improving pediatric and adolescent health outcomes and empowering and educating parents

Editor-in-Chief:

Sherif Badawy, MS, MD, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago


JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting (JPP) is an open access journal. JPP has a unique focus on technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, informatics applications for patient/parent education, training, counselling, behavioral interventions, preventative interventions and clinical care for pediatric and adolescent populations or child-parent dyads. JPP recognizes the role of patient- and parent-centered approaches in the 21st century using information and communication technologies to optimize pediatric and adolescent health outcomes.

As an open access journal, we are read by clinicians, patients, and parents/caregivers alike. We, as all journals published by JMIR Publications, have a focus on applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews). The journal is indexed in PMC and PubMed. JPP has no submission fee. 

Be a founding author of this new journal and submit your paper today!


Recent Articles

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Parent and Child Education on Healthy Eating and Nutrition

eHealth and web-based service delivery have become increasingly common during the COVID-19 pandemic. Digital interventions may be highly appealing to young people; however, their effectiveness compared with that of the usual face-to-face interventions is unknown. As nutrition interventions merge with the digital world, there is a need to determine the best practices for digital interventions for children.

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Kids' and Adolescents' Use of Technology

Excessive smartphone use is a new and debated phenomenon frequently mentioned in the context of behavioral addiction, showing both shared and distinct traits when compared to pathological gaming and gambling.

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Parent and Caregiver Education and Behavior Change for Injury/Accident Prevention

Safe Sleep Community Baby Showers address strategies to prevent sleep-related infant deaths. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, these events transitioned from in-person to virtual.

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Telepediatrics

Data regarding the acceptability, feasibility, and quality of telehealth among adolescents and young adults (AYA) and their parents and caregivers (caregivers) are lacking.

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Social Media for Parenting

Parenting practices are highly influenced by perceived social norms. Social norms and American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines for infant safe sleep practices are often inconsistent. Instagram has become one of the most popular social media websites among young adults (including many expectant and new parents). We hypothesized that the majority of Instagram images of infant sleep and sleep environments are inconsistent with AAP guidelines, and that the number of “likes” for each image would not correlate with adherence of the image to these guidelines.

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Chronic Disease Self-Management in Childhood and Adolescence

Daytime urinary incontinence (UI) is common in childhood and often persists into adolescence. UI in adolescence is associated with a range of adverse outcomes, including depressive symptoms, peer victimization, poor self-image, and problems with peer relationships. The first-line conservative treatment for UI is bladder training (standard urotherapy) that aims to establish a regular fluid intake and a timed schedule for toilet visits. The success of bladder training is strongly dependent on good concordance, which can be challenging for young people.

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Social Media for Parenting

Limited research evidence exists on the development of web-based platforms for reciprocal communication, coproduction research, and dissemination of information among parents, professionals, and researchers. This paper provides learning and the outcomes of setting up a bespoke web-based platform using social media.

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Epidemiologic Studies and Surveys in Child Health

COVID-19 has infected over 123 million people globally. The first confirmed case in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) was reported on January 29, 2020. According to studies conducted in the early epicenters of the pandemic, COVID-19 has fared mildly in the pediatric population. To date, there is a lack of published data about COVID-19 infection among children in the Arabian region.

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Parenting

Mindfulness practices are associated with improved health and well-being for children. Few studies have assessed parents’ acceptance of learning about mindfulness practices.

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Mental Health Issues in Adolescence

Anxiety is common among youths in primary care. Face-to-face treatment has been the first choice for clinicians, but during the COVID-19 pandemic, digital psychological interventions have substantially increased. Few studies have examined young people’s interest in internet treatment or the attitudes they and their parents have toward it.

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Parenting

Parents commonly experience anxiety, worry, and psychological distress in caring for newborn infants, particularly those born preterm. Web-based therapist services may offer greater accessibility and timely psychological support for parents but are nevertheless labor intensive due to their interactive nature. Chatbots that simulate humanlike conversations show promise for such interactive applications.

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