JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting

Improving pediatric and adolescent health outcomes and empowering and educating parents.

Editor-in-Chief:

Sherif Badawy, MD, MS, MBA, Associate Professor of Pediatrics; Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Illinois, United States


Impact Factor 3.7

JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting (JPP, ISSN: 2561-6722, Impact Factor 3.7) is an open access journal. JPP has a unique focus on technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, informatics applications for patient/parent education, training, counselling, behavioral interventions, preventative interventions and clinical care for pediatric and adolescent populations or child-parent dyads. JPP recognizes the role of patient- and parent-centered approaches in the 21st century using information and communication technologies to optimize pediatric and adolescent health outcomes.

As an open access journal, we are read by clinicians, patients, and parents/caregivers alike. We, as all journals published by JMIR Publications, have a focus on applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews).

In 2023, JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting received an inaugural Journal Impact Factor™ of 3.7 (Source: Journal Citation Reports™ from Clarivate, 2023)JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting is indexed in PubMedPubMed CentralDOAJScopus, EBSCO/EBSCO Essentials, and the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate).

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Recent Articles

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General Articles

My E-Diary for Activities and Lifestyle (MEDAL) is a web-based time-use diary developed to assess the diet and movement behaviors of Asian school children.

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Mobile Health and Apps for Maternal and Child Health

Concussion is a common adolescent injury that can result in a constellation of symptoms, negatively affecting academic performance, neurobiological development, and quality of life. Mobile health (mHealth) technologies, such as apps for patients to report symptoms or wearables to measure physiological metrics like heart rate, have been shown to be promising in health maintenance. However, there is limited evidence about mHealth engagement in adolescents with concussion during their recovery course.

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Kids' and Adolescents' Use of Technology

Internet addiction is an emerging mental health issue in this digital age. Nowadays, children start using the internet in early childhood, thus making them vulnerable to addictive use. Previous studies have reported that the risk of internet addiction tends to be higher in lower-income regions with lower quality of life, such as Indonesia. Indonesia has high risks and prevalence of internet addiction, including in children. Digital interventions have been developed as an option to combat internet addiction in children. However, little is known about what parents and therapists in Indonesia perceive about these types of interventions.

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Social Media for Parenting

Sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) remains a leading cause of infant mortality; therefore, understanding parental practices of infant sleep at home is essential. Since social media analyses yield invaluable patient perspectives, understanding sleep practices in the context of safe sleep recommendations via a Facebook mother’s group is instrumental for policy makers, healthcare providers, and researchers.

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Mobile Health and Apps for Maternal and Child Health

Recently, digital media, including Internet websites and smartphone applications (apps), have become popular resources for parents to search for child healthcare information. Higher health literacy of parents in obtaining adequate healthcare information and making proper decisions may lead to improved child health outcomes and a reduction in the burden on healthcare providers. However, few studies have examined the association between the provision of healthcare information apps for infants and parents’ health literacy.

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Pain in Children and Adolescents

Digital interventions are increasingly popular for the provision of nonpharmacological pain interventions, but few exist for adolescents with menstrual pain. User-centered design involves incorporating users across phases of digital health intervention design, development, and implementation and leads to improved user engagement and outcomes. A needs assessment is the first step of this approach.

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Reviews in Pediatrics

Premature birth rates have slightly increased globally, making its prevention critical for both short-term and long-term health outcomes. Various interventions have been developed in response to the multifaceted risk factors for premature birth, including internet-based programs. These programs offer accessibility and enhanced engagement; however, their overall efficacy in preventing premature births requires thorough evaluation.

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Involvement of Pediatric Populations in Health and Health Services Research

After the implementation of 2- and 3-child policies, the rising proportion of high-age and high-risk pregnancies put enormous pressure on maternal and child health (MCH) services for China. This populous nation with an increasing population flow imperatively required the support of large-scale information systems for management. Municipal MCH information systems were commonly applied in developed cities of eastern provinces in China. However, implementation of provincial MCH information systems in relatively low-income areas is lacking. In 2020, the implementation of a regional maternal and child information system (RMCIS) in Inner Mongolia filled this gap.

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Caregiving and Parenting for Chronic Pediatric Diseases

Despite the growing uptake of smart technologies in pediatric type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) care, little is known about caregiving parents’ skills to deal with electronic health information sources.

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Telepediatrics

The outbreak of COVID-19 has turned the care model of health systems around the world upside down. The healthcare crisis has led to opportunities for digital health to deliver quality care and the system has been redirected towards telemedicine. In Catalonia (Spain), as of March 2020, the pattern of visits in paediatric primary care consultations changed, such that face-to-face visits decreased in favour of non-face-to-face visits.

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Mobile Health and Apps for Maternal and Child Health

Milk and egg allergies significantly impact the quality of life, particularly in children. In this regard, food oral immunotherapy (OIT) has emerged as an effective treatment option; however, the occurrence of frequent adverse reactions poses a challenge, necessitating close monitoring during treatment.

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