JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting

Improving pediatric and adolescent health outcomes and empowering and educating parents

Editor-in-Chief:

Sherif Badawy, MS, MD, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago


JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting (JPP) is an open access journal. JPP has a unique focus on technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, informatics applications for patient/parent education, training, counselling, behavioral interventions, preventative interventions and clinical care for pediatric and adolescent populations or child-parent dyads. JPP recognizes the role of patient- and parent-centered approaches in the 21st century using information and communication technologies to optimize pediatric and adolescent health outcomes.

As an open access journal, we are read by clinicians, patients, and parents/caregivers alike. We, as all journals published by JMIR Publications, have a focus on applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews). The journal is indexed in PMC and PubMed. JPP has no submission fee. 

Be a founding author of this new journal and submit your paper today!


Recent Articles

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School-based Health Education and Interventions

Any delays in language development may affect learning, profoundly influencing personal, social, and professional trajectories. The effectiveness of the Sign 4 Big Feelings (S4BF) intervention was investigated by measuring changes in early years outcomes (EYOs) after a 3-month period.

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Mental Health Issues in Adolescence

Mental health difficulties in children and adolescents are highly prevalent; however, only a minority receive adequate mental health care. Internet-delivered interventions offer a promising opportunity to increase access to mental health treatment. Research has demonstrated their effectiveness as a treatment for depression and anxiety in adults. This work provides an up-to-date examination of the available intervention options and their effectiveness for children and young people (CYP).

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Parenting

Concussions, which are known as mild traumatic brain injuries, are complex injuries caused by direct or indirect blows to the head and are increasingly being recognized as a significant public health concern for children and their families. Previous research has identified few studies examining the efficacy of educational interventions on parental concussion knowledge. The aim of this research was to actively work together with children who have experienced a concussion and their parents to develop, refine, and evaluate the usability of a web-based infographic for pediatric concussion.

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Parent and Caregiver Education and Behavior Change for Injury/Accident Prevention

Falls represent the most common mechanism of injury requiring hospitalization among children under 12 months, and they commonly result in traumatic brain injury. Epidemiological studies exploring infant falls demonstrate the experienced burden, but they lack contextual information vital to the development of preventive interventions.

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Social Media in Adolescence

Digital technology and social media use are common among young people in Australia and worldwide. Research suggests that young people have both positive and negative experiences online, but we know little about the experiences of Muslim communities.

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Parenting

Parents often search the web for health-related information for themselves or on behalf of their children, which may impact their health-related decision-making and behaviors. In particular, searching for somatic symptoms such as headaches, fever, or fatigue is common. However, little is known about how psychological and relational factors relate to the characteristics of successful symptom-related internet searches. To date, few studies have used experimental designs that connect participant subjective search evaluation with objective search behavior metrics.

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Kids' and Adolescents' Use of Technology

Digital technology and media use is integral to adolescents’ lives and has been associated with both positive and negative health consequences. Previous studies have largely focused on understanding technology behaviors and outcomes within adolescent populations, which can promote assumptions about adolescent technology use as homogeneous. Furthermore, many studies on adolescent technology use have focused on risks and negative outcomes. To better understand adolescent digital technology use, we need new approaches that can assess distinct profiles within study populations and take a balanced approach to understanding the risks and benefits of digital technology use.

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Pain in Children and Adolescents

Intravenous injection is the most common medical treatment and the main cause of pain in hospitalized children. If there is no appropriate health care for pain relief, the proportion of moderate and severe pain often exceeds 70%. With nonpharmaceutical-based pain management, Buzzy is recognized as an effective device for rapidly relieving injection pain in hospitalized children. However, Buzzy is not widely used in Asia and very few experimental studies in Asia have addressed the effectiveness of the Buzzy device at treating needle pain in hospitalized children.

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Theme Issue: Digital Approaches for Pediatric Healthcare Delivery During the Coronavirus (Covid-19) Pandemic

In an increasingly connected world and in the midst of a global pandemic, digital trials offer numerous advantages over traditional trials that rely on physical study sites. Digital trials have the potential to improve access to research and clinical treatments for the most vulnerable and minoritized, including pregnant and postpartum individuals. However, digital trials are underutilized in maternal and child health research, and there is limited evidence to inform the design and conduct of digital trials. Our research collaborative, consisting of 5 research teams in the U.S. and Australia, aimed to address this gap. We collaborated to share lessons learned from our experiences recruiting and retaining pregnant and postpartum individuals in digital trials of social and behavioral interventions. We first discuss the promise of digital trials in improving participation in research during the perinatal period, as well as the unique challenges they pose. Second, we present lessons learned from 12 completed and ongoing digital trials that have used platforms such as Ovia, Facebook, and Instagram for recruitment. Our trials evaluated interventions for breastfeeding, prenatal and postpartum depression, insomnia, decision making, and chronic pain. We focus on challenges and lessons learned in 3 key areas: (1) rapid recruitment of large samples with a diversity of minoritized identities, (2) retention of study participants in longitudinal studies, and (3) prevention of fraudulent enrollment. We offer concrete strategies that we pilot-tested to address these challenges. Strategies presented in this commentary can be incorporated, as well as formally evaluated, in future studies.

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Social Media in Adolescence

High media use has been implicated in negative social and health outcomes among adolescents. Therefore, it is critical that adolescents develop skills to healthily engage with media content. Media health literacy (MHL), skills for assessing and responding to health-related media content, and potentially targetable moderators for the relationship between media use and health-related outcomes are understudied in adolescents. The lack of MHL assessment tools may have contributed to this research gap.

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Children and Youth with Disabilities

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that results in altered behavior, social development, and communication patterns. In recent years, autism prevalence has tripled, with 1 in 44 children now affected. Given that traditional diagnosis is a lengthy, labor-intensive process that requires the work of trained physicians, significant attention has been given to developing systems that automatically detect autism. We work toward this goal by analyzing audio data, as prosody abnormalities are a signal of autism, with affected children displaying speech idiosyncrasies such as echolalia, monotonous intonation, atypical pitch, and irregular linguistic stress patterns.

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