JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting

Improving pediatric and adolescent health outcomes and empowering and educating parents.

Editor-in-Chief:

Sherif Badawy, MD, MS, MBA, Associate Professor of Pediatrics; Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Illinois, United States


Impact Factor 3.7

JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting (JPP, ISSN: 2561-6722, Impact Factor 3.7) is an open access journal. JPP has a unique focus on technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, informatics applications for patient/parent education, training, counselling, behavioral interventions, preventative interventions and clinical care for pediatric and adolescent populations or child-parent dyads. JPP recognizes the role of patient- and parent-centered approaches in the 21st century using information and communication technologies to optimize pediatric and adolescent health outcomes.

As an open access journal, we are read by clinicians, patients, and parents/caregivers alike. We, as all journals published by JMIR Publications, have a focus on applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews).

In 2023, JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting received an inaugural Journal Impact Factor™ of 3.7 (Source: Journal Citation Reports™ from Clarivate, 2023)JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting is indexed in PubMedPubMed CentralDOAJScopus, EBSCO/EBSCO Essentials, and the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate).

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Recent Articles

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Games in Pediatrics

Regular physical activity and exercise are fundamental components of a healthy lifestyle for youth living with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Yet few youth living with T1D achieve the daily minimum recommended levels of physical activity. In all youth, regardless of their disease status, minutes of physical activity compete with other daily activities, including digital gaming. There is an emerging area of research exploring whether digital games could be displacing other physical activity and exercise in youth, though, to date, no studies have examined this question in youth living with T1D.

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Parent and Child Education on Healthy Eating and Nutrition

Fathers play a pivotal role in parenting and child feeding, but they remain underrepresented in intervention studies, especially those focused on disadvantaged populations. A better understanding of fathers’ experiences and needs regarding support access and child nutrition information in the context of disadvantage can inform future interventions engaging fathers.

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Diabetes Education and Self-Management in Childhood and Adolescence

Social media have shown the potential to support type 1 diabetes self-management by providing informational, emotional, and peer-to-peer support. However, the perceptions of young people and health care professionals’ (HCPs) toward the use of social media for type 1 diabetes self-management have not been systematically reviewed.

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Research Letter

This Research Letter describes the increasing trend of almost constant social media use among California adolescents aged 12-17 between 2019-2021 and an examination of the association between social media use with serious psychological distress. Using multivariate logistic regression models, this study finds a positive association between almost constant social media use and serious psychological distress, controlling for demographics, family connection, and adverse childhood experiences (ACEs). While acknowledging the cross-sectional nature of the data as a limitation, the findings add to the growing literature on the possible implications of growing social media use on mental health and underscore the importance of considering familial and experiential factors in examining mental health implications of pervasive social media use among adolescents.

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Parent and Child Education on Healthy Eating and Nutrition

Entertainment media content is often mentioned as one of the roots of children’s unhealthy food consumption. This might be due to the high amount of presented unhealthy foods in children’s media environment. However, less is known about the role of food placement centrality, that is, whether foods are interacted with it, consumed, verbally mentioned, or appear unobtrusively. We also lack longitudinal research measuring both, children’s unhealthy and healthy food consumption behaviors as outcomes.

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Parenting

The COVID-19 pandemic transformed the home lives of many families in the United States, especially those with young children. Understanding the relationship between child and parent screen time and family stressors exacerbated by the pandemic may help inform interventions that aim to support early child development.

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General Articles

My E-Diary for Activities and Lifestyle (MEDAL) is a web-based time-use diary developed to assess the diet and movement behaviors of Asian school children.

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Mobile Health and Apps for Maternal and Child Health

Concussion is a common adolescent injury that can result in a constellation of symptoms, negatively affecting academic performance, neurobiological development, and quality of life. Mobile health (mHealth) technologies, such as apps for patients to report symptoms or wearables to measure physiological metrics like heart rate, have been shown to be promising in health maintenance. However, there is limited evidence about mHealth engagement in adolescents with concussion during their recovery course.

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Kids' and Adolescents' Use of Technology

Internet addiction is an emerging mental health issue in this digital age. Nowadays, children start using the internet in early childhood, thus making them vulnerable to addictive use. Previous studies have reported that the risk of internet addiction tends to be higher in lower-income regions with lower quality of life, such as Indonesia. Indonesia has high risks and prevalence of internet addiction, including in children. Digital interventions have been developed as an option to combat internet addiction in children. However, little is known about what parents and therapists in Indonesia perceive about these types of interventions.

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Social Media for Parenting

Sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) remains a leading cause of infant mortality; therefore, understanding parental practices of infant sleep at home is essential. Since social media analyses yield invaluable patient perspectives, understanding sleep practices in the context of safe sleep recommendations via a Facebook mother’s group is instrumental for policy makers, healthcare providers, and researchers.

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Mobile Health and Apps for Maternal and Child Health

Recently, digital media, including Internet websites and smartphone applications (apps), have become popular resources for parents to search for child healthcare information. Higher health literacy of parents in obtaining adequate healthcare information and making proper decisions may lead to improved child health outcomes and a reduction in the burden on healthcare providers. However, few studies have examined the association between the provision of healthcare information apps for infants and parents’ health literacy.

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