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JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting


Journal Description

JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting (JPP) is a new sister journal of JMIR (the leading open-access journal in health informatics (Impact Factor 2016: 5.175), with a unique focus on technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, informatics applications for patient/parent education in pediatrics, training/counselling and behavioral interventions, preventative interventions and clinical care for children and adolescent populations or child-parent dyads. JPP recognizing that pediatrics in the 21st century should be a participatory process, involving parents and informal caregivers, and using information and communication technologies.

As open access journal we are read by clinicians and patients alike and have (as all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews).

During a limited period of time, there are no fees to publish in this journal. Articles are carfully copyedited and XML-tagged, ready for submission in PubMed Central.

Be a founding author of this new journal and submit your paper today!


Recent Articles:

  • Source: Flickr; Copyright: Royalty-Free/Corbis; URL:; License: Creative Commons Attribution + Noncommercial + ShareAlike (CC-BY-NC-SA).

    Adolescents’ Perspectives on Using Technology for Health: Qualitative Study


    Background: Adolescents’ wide use of technology opens up opportunities to integrate technology into health visits and health care. In particular, technology has the potential to influence adolescent behavior change by offering new avenues for provider communication and support for healthy choices through many different platforms. However, little information exists to guide the integration of technology into adolescent health care, especially adolescents’ perspectives and preferences for what they find useful. Objective: This qualitative study aimed to take a broad approach to understanding adolescents’ use of technology for supporting their overall health and to understand whether and how adolescents envision using technology to enhance their health and clinical care, particularly in communicating with their provider. Methods: Adolescents (13-18 years) were recruited to participate in semi-structured, in-depth individual interviews. Potential participants were approached in-person through the Seattle Children's Hospital Adolescent Medicine Clinic while they were waiting for consultation appointments, through outreach to youth who expressed interest in other local research study activities, and via flyers in waiting rooms. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using a thematic analysis approach. Results: Thirty-one adolescents (58% female, mean age 15.2 years) were interviewed and described 3 main uses of technology: (1) to gather information, (2a) to share their own experiences and (2b) view others’ experiences in order to gain social support or inspiration, and (3) to track behaviors and health goals. Perceived benefits and potential downsides were identified for technology use. Teens desired to use technology with their provider for 3 main reasons: (1) have questions answered outside of visits, (2) have greater access to providers as a way to build relationship/rapport, and (3) share data regarding behaviors in between visits. Social media was not a preferred method for communicating with providers for any of the youth due to concerns about privacy and intrusiveness. Conclusions: Although youth are avid users of technology in general, in regard to technology for health, they display specific use preferences especially in how they wish to use it to communicate with their primary care provider. Health care providers should offer guidance to youth with regard to how they have used and plan to use technology and how to balance potential positives and negatives of use. Technology developers should take youth preferences into account when designing new health technology and incorporate ways they can use it to communicate with their health care provider.

  • Source: Flickr; Copyright: Metropolitan Transportation Authority of the State of New York; URL:; License: Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY).

    Theoretically-Based Emotion Regulation Strategies Using a Mobile App and Wearable Sensor Among Homeless Adolescent Mothers: Acceptability and Feasibility Study


    Background: Many adolescent mothers are parenting young children under highly stressful conditions as they are managing first-time parenthood, poverty, lack of housing, school and work, and challenging peer and familial relationships. Mobile health (mHealth) technology has the potential to intervene at various points in the emotion regulation process of adolescent mothers to provide them support for more adaptive emotional and behavioral regulation in the course of their daily life. Objective: The goal of this study was to examine the acceptability, feasibility, use patterns, and mechanisms by which a mobile technology used as an adjunct to in-person, provider-delivered sessions fostered adolescent mothers’ adaptive emotion regulation strategies under real-life conditions. Methods: Participants (N=49) were enrolled in the intervention condition of a larger pilot study of homeless adolescent mothers living in group-based shelters. The mHealth technology, Calm Mom, consisted of a mobile app and a wrist-worn sensorband for the ambulatory measurement and alerting of increased electrodermal activity (EDA), a physiological measurement of stress. We examined logs of mobile app activity and conducted semistructured qualitative interviews with a subsample (N=10) of participants. Qualitative data analysis was guided by the theoretical frames of the intervention and a technology acceptance model and included an analysis of emerging themes and concepts. Results: Overall, participants indicated that one or more of the elements of Calm Mom supported their ability to effectively regulate their emotions in the course of their daily life in ways that were consonant with the intervention’s theoretical model. For many adolescent mothers, the app became an integral tool for managing stress. Due to technical challenges, fewer participants received sensorband alerts; however, those who received alerts reported high levels of acceptability as the technology helped them to identify their emotions and supported them in engaging in more adaptive behaviors during real-life stressful situations with their children, peers, and family members. Conclusions: Calm Mom is a promising technology for providing theoretically driven behavioral intervention strategies during real-life stressful moments among a highly vulnerable population. Future research efforts will involve addressing technology challenges and refining tailoring algorithms for implementation in larger-scale studies.

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Latest Submissions Open for Peer-Review:

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  • Parent Preferences for Methods and Content of Technology Based Asthma Risk Communication

    Date Submitted: Mar 7, 2018

    Open Peer Review Period: Mar 8, 2018 - May 3, 2018

    Background: Interventions to improve preventive care delivery to children with asthma are increasingly designed around mobile technology. Objective: Our objective was to develop insight into parent us...

    Background: Interventions to improve preventive care delivery to children with asthma are increasingly designed around mobile technology. Objective: Our objective was to develop insight into parent use of mobile technology and their preferences for methods and content of an asthma risk communication intervention. Methods: Using qualitative methods, interviews of parents of children with asthma were conducted. The open-ended, semi-structured interview guide included questions about current mobile technology use, barriers to controller medication adherence, and preferences for methods and content of a mobile technology based asthma risk communication intervention. Using grounded theory methodology, we coded the transcripts and identified emerging themes. Results: 20 parents of children with asthma completed interviews. 80% had public insurance. 40% had been in the ICU for their asthma at some point. 35% were currently on a combined ICS/LABA. 3 major themes were identified: Room for improvement/welcoming help, distinct preferences for risk communication, and electronic reachability. Room for improvement/welcoming help includes caretakers recognizing that busy lifestyles contribute to adherence challenges and welcoming a program to help them manage their child’s asthma. Distinct preferences for risk communication includes a need for two-way communication, preference for electronic communication as well as acceptable communication frequency. Electronic reachability includes parents’ electronic habits and specific preferences for electronic communication. Conclusions: Parents of children with asthma are open to communicating with asthma healthcare providers through mobile technology. There is a strong preference for two-way communication. This will inform the development of future mobile technology based interventions to improve care for children with asthma. Clinical Trial: NA